Jayjack named Director of Communications

jayjack news itemHelp INHF congratulate Joe Jayjack, our new Director of Communications. Jayjack served as interim director beginning June 1 and will now take over the position permanently. Jayjack will oversee all INHF communications and outreach.

Joe hails from Council Bluffs in the Loess Hills of western Iowa and graduated from the University of South Dakota with a degree in journalism. He has worked for the Des Moines Register as a designer and on the art staff at Cuisine at Home magazine at August Home Publishing.

When Joe joined the INHF team in December as a communications specialist, he knew the position was a great fit: “I have been following INHF for a long time,” he said. “I have always been interested in conservation and have enjoyed the work that INHF has done. With my interest in storytelling and conservation, I thought this would be the perfect job to combine the two and help share the story of the work that INHF does across the state.”

Joe can be reached by email at jjayjack@inhf.org or by phone at 515-288-1846, ext. 19.

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Beat the heat with ice cream

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(Photo by Evan Feekes)

Happy National Ice Cream Month! We know you’re in need of a cold, sweet treat as you enjoy the summer sunshine. Consider making your own ice cream with berries and flowers found in Iowa—like mulberries, honeysuckle or multiflora rose. Continue reading

Biking the Amana Colonies

Kolonieweg in Amana, by Eric Utterback

The Kolonieweg trail running through Amana means “Colony Way.” (Photo by Eric Utterback)

Looking for somewhere new to explore on two wheels this holiday weekend? Check out the new gravel bike routes in the Amana Colonies! The two new routes allow riders to immerse themselves in the histories of Middle, High and West Amana. Continue reading

Nature Walk: Least Skipper

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“Skippers, such as this Least Skipper, are miniature butterflies just slightly larger than a dime and easy to overlook. They move quickly and, when flushed, can disappear deep into vegetation. Look for them in gardens, along roadsides and in natural areas.” — Carl Kurtz

If you are interested in purchasing a print of this photo or requesting information on possible use of any of our “Nature Walk” photographs, please contact Carl Kurtz at cpkurtz@netins.net. View our other Nature Walk posts!

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Volunteer spotlight: ISU students volunteer for “magical” day

Six Iowa State University Natural Resource and Ecology Management (NREM) graduate students used their skills to help open up and restore a remnant prairie on a March day this spring on a Boone County woodland just 20 minutes from campus. This is the fifth time ISU’s NREM students have worked on the site.

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Students from ISU’s Natural Resource and Ecology Management department and INHF staffers work with David Marlow to reclaim a hilltop on the Gardner Property in Boone County. (Gifford the dog was a big help, too.)

“What is interesting about this student group,” INHF Volunteer Coordinator Mary Runkel said, “is that even with students flowing through the program and graduating each year, the passion and knowledge never seems to leave because the leadership is handed down and new energy emerges.” Continue reading

DeCook Field Day

Buffalo roam DeCook's ranch in Monroe County. (Photo by Ron Huelse)

Buffalo roam DeCook’s ranch in Monroe County. (Photo by Ron Huelse)

INHF board member Mike DeCook will host a Practical Farmers of Iowa field day at his ranch in Lovilia on Tuesday, July 28, from 1-4 p.m. The afternoon will be an opportunity for guests to brush up on their pollinator, prairie and bison-grazing education. Continue reading

The Silent City

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Along the Big Sioux River in the northwest corner of Iowa lays Blood Run. Splitting its 3,000 acres between Iowa and South Dakota, this land was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970. INHF later helped acquire portions of the site in the early 1980s. Continue reading

Nature Walk: Red-Headed Woodpecker

The abundance of woodpeckers such as the red-headed directly relates to available habitat and food supply.  Their numbers may increase after storms cause widespread tree damage or from diseases such as Dutch elm disease, which killed American elms in the 60s and 70s.  Leaving occasional dead trees gives them future nest sites.

“The abundance of woodpeckers such as the red-headed directly relates to available habitat and food supply. Their numbers may increase after storms cause widespread tree damage or from diseases such as Dutch elm disease, which killed American elms in the ’60s and ’70s. Leaving occasional dead trees gives them future nest sites.” — Carl Kurtz

If you are interested in purchasing a print of this photo or requesting information on possible use of any of our “Nature Walk” photographs, please contact Carl Kurtz at cpkurtz@netins.net. View our other Nature Walk posts!

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