Iowa By Trail: Jersey Contest

jerseys_graphicTo celebrate the nearing arrival of the Iowa By Trail app on Android we’re celebrating with a bike jersey contest on the Iowa By Trail Facebook page. Vote for your favorite design for a chance to win a free jersey! We’ll be giving away three jerseys after the contest, so make sure yours is on the top. The winning jersey will be featured in our upcoming promotions and giveaways.

The contest will until September 26.

All voters must be at least 18 years of age and a resident of Iowa. Voters are allowed to vote once each day until the contest ends. INHF employees and immediate families are not eligible to win but may still participate in voting.

Any questions? Contact ibt@inhf.org.

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Wordless Wednesday – Chicken of the Woods

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The Chicken of the Woods can be found from late summer to fall sitting at the base of dead or dying trees—never on the ground or alone in fields. The one photographed above is a very young Chicken of the Woods. As they mature, they turn orange and have more of a shelf or bracket fungi appearance. At this stage, they are delicious and can be sautéed for a relatively short time prior to eating. Once they get older they require a bit of marinade and a couple or few hours of cooking but are still great eating! Check in with next week’s Wordless Wednesday post to see this little guy’s transformation.

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Nature Walk: Wild Turkeys

Wild Turkeys

“Wild Turkeys are our largest gallinaceous birds (quail, grouse, pheasants and turkeys). After broods hatch in late spring or early summer, family groups can be seen wandering through woodlands, open clearings and in farm fields. They are particularly fond of corn, acorns, insects and berries. By late summer the full-size young look nearly identical to adult birds. Wild turkeys roost in trees at night and if flushed can fly surprisingly long distances. ” -Carl Kurtz

If you are interested in purchasing a print of this photo or requesting information on possible use of any of our “Nature Walk” photographs, please contact Carl Kurtz at cpkurtz@netins.net. View our other Nature Walk posts!

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Folks at Faulkes, an event to restore the ecosystem of the Woods

FaulkesJoin us for an event to restore a public woodland! Japanese Barberry is an invasive plant that has begun to take over the woodland — by removing it, we can help the native ecosystem thrive once again. Come and give back to the woods and meet others interested in doing the same! This is a partnership event involving INHF, Trees Forever, the Marion Parks and Rec and Winding Pathways, LLC. Continue reading

Prairie Awakening Celebration

Prairie Awakening CelebrationJoin the Dallas County Conservation Board this Saturday, September 6th to hear the story of the Ioway Nation through music, dance, stories and more!

This event will be held in an arena carved out of the restored tall grass prairies of Kuehn to remember the land. In this intimate, one-to one setting the Dallas County Conservation Board hopes to form conversations between cultures that will go beyond a history lesson. As the prairie is being awaken, they hope to restore connections to their home. Continue reading

Nature Walk: Sweet Coneflowers

Sweet Coneflowers

“Sweet Coneflowers are found in moist prairie swales. They are perennial, can be 5 feet in height and have dramatic spreading displays of flowers in late summer. We may think of them as Black-eyed Susans, which have very similar flowers and found in native prairies, but are biennial, much shorter in height and bloom in early summer.” -Carl Kurtz

If you are interested in purchasing a print of this photo or requesting information on possible use of any of our “Nature Walk” photographs, please contact Carl Kurtz at cpkurtz@netins.net. View our other Nature Walk posts!

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