Meet Abby Terpstra, INHF’s new Development Specialist

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INHF is happy to introduce our newest staff member, Abby Hade Terpstra. Abby has been working as our development specialist for a little over a month now, and we’re so glad to have her as part of the INHF family!

Abby grew up in Ames, Iowa, then headed to Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin. She graduated with a B.S. in Outdoor Education: Natural History.

Abby spent the next 12 years exploring a number of different jobs in a number of different cities. She’s worked at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science, acted as the Membership Coordinator for Sustainable Connections in Washington state and even traveled to New Zealand for three months.

After jumping from state to state, Abby decided to return home. She now lives in Ames with her husband and two young kids.

Since coming back to Iowa, Abby has found a new home at INHF. “I love the long term thinking at INHF and the focus on permanent protection,” she said. “I’m looking forward to getting to know conservation-minded landowners. It gives me hope.”

Celebrate the Magic of Turin Prairie

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You sit among the grasses and flowers on the steep slope, with the encompassing blue sky around and above and in places, even below you. Your gaze slides down the graceful multi-textured hillsides, then dances over the treetops huddled in the valleys. Across the flatlands below and beyond the hills, you can sense the Missouri River and Nebraska on the vague horizon. The sun and breeze caress you. Birdsong beckons amid the hush. You are immersed in nature, not focused on yourself, glad to be a small part of a vast and complex wholeness. That’s a sweet moment at Turin Prairie.

It’s time to celebrate the magic of this place, the joy of its permanence and the trust and dogged determination required to protect it. And, to pause to appreciate all the people involved in protecting Turin Prairie. Every member of Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation had a hand in this, and nearly 1,000 people reading this magazine gave specifically to protect Turin Prairie.

Turin Prairie’s numbers are impressive: hundreds of acres, $2 million, four years in the making. But Turin Prairie’s story is more about heart than numbers. Continue reading

6 ways funding the Trust will benefit Iowans

In 2010, a majority of voters created the Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Trust Fund, a permanent and constitutionally protected funding source that will ensure Iowa’s natural areas are protected and preserved for future generations. The Trust will be funded once the Iowa legislature raises the sales tax by at least 3/8 of a cent.

Here are 6 ways funding the trust will directly benefit Iowans. Continue reading

DIY Bike Clock

Calling all cyclists–keep up the RAGBRAI spirit year round with this do-it-yourself bike clock! Full instructions below.

Supplies:

  • Bike rim
  • Metal house numbers (we used 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9)
  • Spray paint in color of your choice
  • Super glue
  • Clock kit
    • Minute hand
    • Hour hand
    • Square battery piece
    • Rubber gasket
    • Brass washer
    • Mounting nut
    • Open nut
    • Appropriate battery
  • Metal sprocket or other decoration (optional)

Steps:

  1. Gather your materials. If you’re having trouble finding an old bike rim, check out your town’s local bike collective. They might have an extra you could buy or have.
  2. Clean the bike rim of any cobwebs, dust or dirt.
  3. Lay out the house numbers in a well-ventilated area. Cover your work space with newspaper. Apply an even coat of spray paint to the front of the numbers. PRO TIP: Immediately after painting, carefully transfer the numbers to wax paper. This will allow them to dry properly without sticking to the newspaper.
  4. Once the painted numbers are dry, attach them to the rim in their designated positions with super glue. Glue the 1 and 2 next to each other to create a 12. Let dry.
  5. Next, put a battery in the square piece of the clock kit, and glue the kit in the center of the rim. Make sure to leave enough room to change the battery.
  6. Glue your sprocket or decoration, in our case an acorn, on top of the square clock piece. Let dry. PRO TIP: Make sure that your decoration has a hole in it that allows the nub of the clock kit to peek through. This is where we will attach the clock hands.
  7. Follow the instructions in your kit to attach the clock hands. We screwed on the rubber gasket, then the brass washer, mounting nut, hour hand, minute hand and open nut.
  8. Set clock to appropriate time.

Wade Franck Memorial Bicycle Ride

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Join us in honoring Wade Franck, a central Iowa cyclist who was killed by a drunk driver last August while participating in an organized bike ride in Des Moines.

A Memorial Bicycle Ride on one of Wade’s favorite trails, the High Trestle Trail, is planned on his birthday, Saturday, August 13, 2016 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The ride is free, but raffle tickets, auctions and donations will be available to raise funds for the connector trail that will link the High Trestle Trail in Woodward to the Raccoon River Valley Trail in Perry.

There will be a drawing for a custom-fit Specialized AWOL bicycle with an estimated value of $3,700. Donate or purchase your $20 raffle tickets here.

Follow #RideForWade on Twitter and stay tuned for more information!

Writing new chapters for Central Iowa trails

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The world famous High Trestle Trail provides bikers and hikers breathtaking views of the Des Moines River Valley.

Nearly 40 years ago the Central Iowa trail network got its start with the establishment of the Bill Riley Trail. This short trail links Waterworks Park with Greenwood Park and the neighborhoods near the Des Moines Art Center and the former Science Center of Iowa location. It was a modest beginning named after the famous Iowa State Fair talent scout and television personality who loved trails.

Today the network of trails in central Iowa has grown to include local neighborhood trails
as well as long distance regional trails stretching in all directions. The current plan envisions the regional spine extending 70 miles west to Whiterock Conservancy, 45 miles southeast to Lake Red Rock, 80 miles northeast to Pine Lake State Park, 25 miles south to Lake Ahquabi, as well as existing connections to Jefferson, Martensdale and Ames. Continue reading

Apply Now: INHF’s fall communications internship

Kerri-Lois-cropped-2-239x300Test the waters in all aspects of communications — magazine writing, press releases, photography, social media, websites, blogs and more — with Iowa’s leading natural conservation organization.

Join Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation this fall as a communications intern. You’ll be working on media projects to help promote INHF’s work and mission. Applications are due Friday, August 5. 

Job description
The communications intern writes news releases and magazine articles about INHF projects, assists with special events (like our annual Hagie Heritage Award), writes blog posts, updates our website and social media, and much more. Depending on organizational needs and intern skills, he/she may also assist with public events, photography and occasional graphic design. Continue reading

Now accepting nominations for the 2016 Hagie Heritage Award

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Mary Lewis (left) and Beth Lynch (center), were our 2015 Hagie Heritage Award recipients. Lewis and Lynch were recognized for their extensive conservation efforts, including the removal of garlic mustard from area parks.

Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation invites you, your agency, partners or friends to nominate an outstanding Iowa conservationist for the 2016 Lawrence and Eula Hagie Heritage Award.

The nomination process is easy and a great way to bring deserved recognition for your nominee and for the nominating organization(s). Nominations are due Friday, August 5, 2016.

The annual Hagie Award recognizes Iowans “who have demonstrated an extraordinary personal service and commitment to improving the quality of Iowa’s natural environment and who encourage others to do the same.” The award generally goes to volunteers, but professional nominees are eligible if their efforts clearly go well beyond their job duties.

For more information on the Hagie Heritage Award and nomination process, visit the INHF website at www.inhf.org/hagie.cfm or call 515-288-1846 for a printed copy. Please send all correspondence and questions to Katie Bandurski, INHF communications intern, via e-mail at comminternkatie@inhf.org or by mail to:

Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation
Attn: Katie Bandurski
505 Fifth Ave, Suite 444
Des Moines, IA 50309-2321

All nominations must be received by August 5, 2016.


Lawrence and Eula Hagie Heritage Award

Recognizes Iowans who devote outstanding voluntary, personal service and commitment to improving the quality of Iowa’s natural environment and who encourage others to do the same.

Winners receive $1,000 cash and a hand-carved acorn sculpture. The Hagie grandchildren inherited a farm in Henry County and income from this farm was used by Janice Hagie Shindel of Florida and Ila Jeanne Hagie Logan of Moville, Iowa, to create an endowment for this award in memory of their parents, Lawrence and Eula Hagie.

Eligibility criteria:

  • Only individuals are eligible — group nominations will not be considered.
  • Nominees must show dedication and commitment to the environment.
  • Letters of recommendation for deceased persons will not be considered.
  • Nominees do not seek recognition as motivation for their work in the environment, but simply believe in what they are doing.
  • Nominees are selected for their personal conservation/environmental accomplishments instead of (or in addition to) professional conservation/environmental accomplishments.
  • Nominees must show a long-term commitment to conservation/environmental projects (issues). Financial contributions are not sufficient basis for nomination.
  • Nominees must be Iowans, but their accomplishments need not be limited to Iowa and can be of regional or national significance.
  • Nominees’ activities and accomplishments must be in line with INHF’s mission: building partnerships and educating Iowans to protect, preserve and enhance Iowa’s natural resources for future generations.

Nomination process:

  • INHF must receive two letters of recommendation for each nominee no later than August 5, 2016.
  • Nominators should coordinate their letters so as to present a well-rounded overview of the nominee’s contributions to the environment/conservation.
  • Nominators must clearly state whom they are nominating. If they are nominating a couple, both letters of recommendation must identify both nominees by name.
  • Letters of recommendation should include the name(s), address and telephone number(s) of both the nominee and the nominator.
  • Letters of recommendation should include a resume of the nominee’s voluntary conservation/environmental accomplishments.
  • Letters of recommendation may be resubmitted in future years if the nominee is not selected.
  • INHF staff are not eligible to be nominated and may not nominate others.

Selection and announcement process overview:

  • All nominators receive a letter confirming receipt of their letters and the validity of the nomination.
  • All nominees receive a letter of congratulations announcing their nomination and the names of the people who nominated them.
  • The names of the nominators will not be revealed to the public, only to the respective nominee.
  • A three-person selection committee comprised of INHF board members and/or advisors is appointed each year by the Chairman of the Board. It is preferable that the committee includes one board member or advisor who has previously served on the selection committee, to provide experience and continuity to the selection process.
  • The committee members review the nominations and meet once to choose the winner.
  • During the informal selection discussion, the committee will remain nonpolitical and no pressure will be applied in the course of choosing the winner. The format of nomination materials should not bias the selection process, as this is a grassroots campaign.
  • The winner and their nominators are notified, and arrangements are made to present the award at a time and place that is convenient and meaningful to them. The award nominators and winner will take the lead on an event. If they do not want to take the lead in hosting, the award will be presented at an INHF Board meeting or other convenient event, such as an Iowa Association of County Conservation Board event.
  • All decisions and conversations of the selection committee are kept confidential until the selection and event plans are announced to the public.
  • INHF arranges for local and statewide publicity when announcing the winner and presenting the award.
  • Nominees who are not chosen are notified.

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