DIY Bike Clock

Calling all cyclists–keep up the RAGBRAI spirit year round with this do-it-yourself bike clock! Full instructions below.

Supplies:

  • Bike rim
  • Metal house numbers (we used 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9)
  • Spray paint in color of your choice
  • Super glue
  • Clock kit
    • Minute hand
    • Hour hand
    • Square battery piece
    • Rubber gasket
    • Brass washer
    • Mounting nut
    • Open nut
    • Appropriate battery
  • Metal sprocket or other decoration (optional)

Steps:

  1. Gather your materials. If you’re having trouble finding an old bike rim, check out your town’s local bike collective. They might have an extra you could buy or have.
  2. Clean the bike rim of any cobwebs, dust or dirt.
  3. Lay out the house numbers in a well-ventilated area. Cover your work space with newspaper. Apply an even coat of spray paint to the front of the numbers. PRO TIP: Immediately after painting, carefully transfer the numbers to wax paper. This will allow them to dry properly without sticking to the newspaper.
  4. Once the painted numbers are dry, attach them to the rim in their designated positions with super glue. Glue the 1 and 2 next to each other to create a 12. Let dry.
  5. Next, put a battery in the square piece of the clock kit, and glue the kit in the center of the rim. Make sure to leave enough room to change the battery.
  6. Glue your sprocket or decoration, in our case an acorn, on top of the square clock piece. Let dry. PRO TIP: Make sure that your decoration has a hole in it that allows the nub of the clock kit to peek through. This is where we will attach the clock hands.
  7. Follow the instructions in your kit to attach the clock hands. We screwed on the rubber gasket, then the brass washer, mounting nut, hour hand, minute hand and open nut.
  8. Set clock to appropriate time.

Writing new chapters for Central Iowa trails

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The world famous High Trestle Trail provides bikers and hikers breathtaking views of the Des Moines River Valley.

Nearly 40 years ago the Central Iowa trail network got its start with the establishment of the Bill Riley Trail. This short trail links Waterworks Park with Greenwood Park and the neighborhoods near the Des Moines Art Center and the former Science Center of Iowa location. It was a modest beginning named after the famous Iowa State Fair talent scout and television personality who loved trails.

Today the network of trails in central Iowa has grown to include local neighborhood trails
as well as long distance regional trails stretching in all directions. The current plan envisions the regional spine extending 70 miles west to Whiterock Conservancy, 45 miles southeast to Lake Red Rock, 80 miles northeast to Pine Lake State Park, 25 miles south to Lake Ahquabi, as well as existing connections to Jefferson, Martensdale and Ames. Continue reading

Now accepting nominations for the 2016 Hagie Heritage Award

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Mary Lewis (left) and Beth Lynch (center), were our 2015 Hagie Heritage Award recipients. Lewis and Lynch were recognized for their extensive conservation efforts, including the removal of garlic mustard from area parks.

Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation invites you, your agency, partners or friends to nominate an outstanding Iowa conservationist for the 2016 Lawrence and Eula Hagie Heritage Award.

The nomination process is easy and a great way to bring deserved recognition for your nominee and for the nominating organization(s). Nominations are due Friday, August 5, 2016.

The annual Hagie Award recognizes Iowans “who have demonstrated an extraordinary personal service and commitment to improving the quality of Iowa’s natural environment and who encourage others to do the same.” The award generally goes to volunteers, but professional nominees are eligible if their efforts clearly go well beyond their job duties.

For more information on the Hagie Heritage Award and nomination process, visit the INHF website at www.inhf.org/hagie.cfm or call 515-288-1846 for a printed copy. Please send all correspondence and questions to Katie Bandurski, INHF communications intern, via e-mail at comminternkatie@inhf.org or by mail to:

Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation
Attn: Katie Bandurski
505 Fifth Ave, Suite 444
Des Moines, IA 50309-2321

All nominations must be received by August 5, 2016.


Lawrence and Eula Hagie Heritage Award

Recognizes Iowans who devote outstanding voluntary, personal service and commitment to improving the quality of Iowa’s natural environment and who encourage others to do the same.

Winners receive $1,000 cash and a hand-carved acorn sculpture. The Hagie grandchildren inherited a farm in Henry County and income from this farm was used by Janice Hagie Shindel of Florida and Ila Jeanne Hagie Logan of Moville, Iowa, to create an endowment for this award in memory of their parents, Lawrence and Eula Hagie.

Eligibility criteria:

  • Only individuals are eligible — group nominations will not be considered.
  • Nominees must show dedication and commitment to the environment.
  • Letters of recommendation for deceased persons will not be considered.
  • Nominees do not seek recognition as motivation for their work in the environment, but simply believe in what they are doing.
  • Nominees are selected for their personal conservation/environmental accomplishments instead of (or in addition to) professional conservation/environmental accomplishments.
  • Nominees must show a long-term commitment to conservation/environmental projects (issues). Financial contributions are not sufficient basis for nomination.
  • Nominees must be Iowans, but their accomplishments need not be limited to Iowa and can be of regional or national significance.
  • Nominees’ activities and accomplishments must be in line with INHF’s mission: building partnerships and educating Iowans to protect, preserve and enhance Iowa’s natural resources for future generations.

Nomination process:

  • INHF must receive two letters of recommendation for each nominee no later than August 5, 2016.
  • Nominators should coordinate their letters so as to present a well-rounded overview of the nominee’s contributions to the environment/conservation.
  • Nominators must clearly state whom they are nominating. If they are nominating a couple, both letters of recommendation must identify both nominees by name.
  • Letters of recommendation should include the name(s), address and telephone number(s) of both the nominee and the nominator.
  • Letters of recommendation should include a resume of the nominee’s voluntary conservation/environmental accomplishments.
  • Letters of recommendation may be resubmitted in future years if the nominee is not selected.
  • INHF staff are not eligible to be nominated and may not nominate others.

Selection and announcement process overview:

  • All nominators receive a letter confirming receipt of their letters and the validity of the nomination.
  • All nominees receive a letter of congratulations announcing their nomination and the names of the people who nominated them.
  • The names of the nominators will not be revealed to the public, only to the respective nominee.
  • A three-person selection committee comprised of INHF board members and/or advisors is appointed each year by the Chairman of the Board. It is preferable that the committee includes one board member or advisor who has previously served on the selection committee, to provide experience and continuity to the selection process.
  • The committee members review the nominations and meet once to choose the winner.
  • During the informal selection discussion, the committee will remain nonpolitical and no pressure will be applied in the course of choosing the winner. The format of nomination materials should not bias the selection process, as this is a grassroots campaign.
  • The winner and their nominators are notified, and arrangements are made to present the award at a time and place that is convenient and meaningful to them. The award nominators and winner will take the lead on an event. If they do not want to take the lead in hosting, the award will be presented at an INHF Board meeting or other convenient event, such as an Iowa Association of County Conservation Board event.
  • All decisions and conversations of the selection committee are kept confidential until the selection and event plans are announced to the public.
  • INHF arranges for local and statewide publicity when announcing the winner and presenting the award.
  • Nominees who are not chosen are notified.

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3 events, 1 great weekend in the Loess Hills

There’s always a good reason to get outdoors, but this trifecta of events will make it impossible to stay inside. Join Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation in western Iowa over the first weekend of June. We’re celebrating our great state’s natural areas with a combined volunteer event, the dedication of a new Bird Conservation Area and the Loess Hills Prairie Seminar.  Continue reading

5 of Iowa’s most invasive species (and how to get rid of them)

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An infestation of Garlic Mustard.

Invasive plant species are like the common cold: They’re easily caught, undesirable and if left untreated, can lead to something much more serious. Across Iowa, a variety of species threaten our native ecosystems. These weeds dominate and choke out wild and native plants, leading to less diverse native natural areas.

The following are five of the most common and threatening invasive species in Iowa.

Continue reading

Pieces of the Puzzle: Waterman Prairie Addition

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The process of completing a land protection project closely resembles putting a puzzle together, and sometimes the pieces are challenging to locate or difficult to put into place.

A 227-acre addition to Waterman Prairie Wildlife Management Area in O’Brien County is part of a “puzzle” that connects two protected natural areas and adds a large tract to the 1500-acre Waterman complex, about 3.5 miles southeast of Sutherland. The addition is host to many distinctive features that make up the northwest Iowa landscape. It boasts soft-edged rolling hills with remnant prairie, a wooded, winding creek, oak savanna and a large oak woodland. The Iowa DNR approached INHF to help acquire this connecting piece in fall 2014. Continue reading

Land protection in Madison County and a milestone for INHF

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Roslea Johnson, left, touring her property with For Land’s Sake.

When Bob and Roslea Johnson donated part of their Madison County farm to INHF, they had no idea that their generosity would help INHF reach a major milestone: 150,000 acres protected statewide.

Since 1979, INHF has worked to protect Iowa’s land, water and wildlife in a variety of ways: through the expansion of publicly-owned lands, the placement of conservation easements on privately-owned lands, the piecing together of miles-long trail projects. It is the foresight and dedication of private landowners like the Johnsons that make the work possible. Continue reading

Where to find local prairie seeds

Narrow Leaf Purple Coneflower JulyFrom purple coneflower to butterfly milkweed, Iowa is home to beautiful native prairie plants. These forbs and grasses not only look pretty, but also provide habitat for Iowa’s pollinators and songbirds. Enjoy all these species have to offer by planting your own! Whether you’re looking to start a native garden or a full-fledged landscape, the right seeds can make all the difference.

INHF thinks having not just native, but local seeds is important for planting. Local simply means seeds that are sourced as close as possible to where they will be planted. This allows for plants to grow in areas that are well suited to accommodate their needs. Continue reading

Winter volunteer day at Razor Prairie

looking-SE-1024x768Al and Mary Razor loved their land. The 24-acre partial woodland, oak savanna and prairie parcel was their everything. And in 2001, with their health on the decline, the Razors decided to permanently protect their land and donate it to INHF.

Help us honor Al and Mary’s legacy with a brush clear at Razor Prairie in Jasper County. Continue reading

Join INHF at the Iowa Prairie Network’s winter meeting

IPN3-logoOn Saturday, Jan. 30, join INHF and fellow nature enthusiasts at the Iowa Prairie Network’s winter meeting!

This year’s event will be held at Ames High School from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come early to participate in a winter prairie hike at the Pohl State Preserve, and stay for speaker presentations, displays and a silent auction.

The proceeds from this year’s auction will benefit INHF’s Sellberg Property in Story County. The 49-acre pasture is home to several prairie remnants and a portion of West Indian Creek. INHF currently owns the property and is working with Story County Conservation Board to raise funds so the project can one day be open to the public.

For more information about the meeting, check out Iowa Prairie Network’s Facebook event or contact Trish Patrick at tpatrick5350@gmail.com. The event is free and open to the public. See you there!

The Iowa Prairie Network is an all volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of prairie heritage in Iowa. Since 1990, IPN has been a network of advocacy for Iowa’s natural heritage, using its funding to support land acquisition and restoration practices.

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